darkwingsnark:

He was honestly the only normal character in the whole movie. 

bitchesaloud:

frozen-fractals-all-around:

a-different-kind-of-royalty:

If you think about it Ursula was actually really nice because she only promised Ariel legs, and she gave her really nice legs that matched her body type and skin color when she could have just as easily given her goat legs

image

squishymew:

kikahchu:

kikahchu:

It’s a space bar!!

Guys, I did not spend $16 on this sticker set for 5 notes.

I thought it was just greasy omg

ri-monster:

 

queen-of-love-and-beauty:

"I don’t wear makeup so I don’t have to waste like an hour in front of the mirror every morning hahahaha"

image

"open books not legs"

image

"why have tequila shots when you can have tea?"

image

"As always, late with Starbucks"

image

"modest is hottest"

image

"I’m not like those girls”

image

the anti love triangle ya book masterpost

herhmione:

are you done with reading a young adult book that springs a love triangle upon you and you HATE IT SO MUCH (i might be a little more passionate about my hatred than is healthy…) and you just wish you could find good books that incorporate romance without love triangles??? your…

bombing:

the reason this generation is failing is because we’re not motivated enough to make money. all the people on the dollar bills are dead. they’re not relevant and teens just can’t connect. we need money with memes and beyonce on it

Jo In Hyuk (South Korea)

Using the simplicity of finely-traced lines and solid colour palettes, South Korean artist and art director Jo In Hyuk explores a range of emotional states with striking portrait illustrations that are as beautiful as they are thoughtful.

Jo’s digital work revolves around the values of youth, sexuality and vulnerability – complex themes that he approaches with awe-inspiring ease, as he represents suffering and grief with a quiet, heavy and almost disturbing dramatic feel. The level of the emotion within Jo’s work is made all the more mesmerising by the deep and enigmatic expressions of the subjects he paints, that one cannot help but feel connected to and struck by.

Although his pastel-coloured illustrations immerse the viewer within dream-like narratives, they are also convincing takes on the raw and real emotions, secrets and states of mind that we hide away from the world – characteristics which ultimately lend his work a particularly magical appeal.

With their fragility and finesse, Jo’s illustrations are subtle echoes of sadness, nostalgia and pain and appear incredibly discreet; yet, beneath their soft appearance, they also contain powerful messages that each of us could identify with and that won’t fail to stun the unsuspecting viewer. Jo speaks with clarity and confidence through his illustrations which, even if developed around more mature themes, always remain innocent and deeply touching.

Our sincere thanks to Abbie Cohen from NeverLazy Magazine for this Art review for Artchipel’s Art Writer’s Wednesday #19.

[more Jo In Hyuk | Art Writer’s Wednesday with Abbie Cohen]

710642:

well? can he????